Media & Events

Alfred Eisenstaedt, Children in Paris watching a "St. George and the Dragon" puppet show, 1963. 

Alfred Eisenstaedt, Children in Paris watching a "St. George and the Dragon" puppet show, 1963. 

Upcoming Events:

Sept. 5 in Kearny, N.J.: Addressing Kearny School District teachers.

Past Events:

April 16, 2015 in Washington, D.C.: Newsmakers panel on games and learning at the National Press Club.

April 20 in Chicago: Education Writers Association's National Seminar.

April 21 in New York City: Education Summit of the 12th annual Games for Change Festival.

April 28 in Washington, D.C.: Thomas B. Fordham Institute. See the event video on Fordham's website.

June 16 in Los Angeles: Greg appears at the E3 Games & Education Summit.

June 23 in Washington, D.C.: Greg appears on NPR's Diane Rehm Show. Click here to listen!

June 30 in Philadelphia: Greg appears at the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) Conference.

July 9 in Madison, Wisc.: Greg appears at Games + Learning + Society conference.

August 7 in Ellicott City, Md.: Reading and signing at Barnes & Noble, Long Gate Shopping Center, 4300 Montgomery Road.

August 28 in Washington, D.C.Reading and signing at Politics & Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave., N.W.

Sept. 2: Greg appears on GeekSwagg Podcast with B.J. Brown. For more information, check their website. 

March 10, 2016 in Austin, Texas: Greg appears at SXSWEdu Conference discussing deeper game-based learning.

April 16 in Annapolis, Md.: Greg appears at Annapolis Book Festival with Jamie Madigan, author of Getting Gamers: The Psychology of Video Games and Their Impact on the People who Play Them

June 29 in Denver: Greg appears at ISTE annual conference discussing iCivics and other learning games.

Dec. 1 in Madison, Wisc.: Greg appears at the University of Wisconsin.

Dec. 8 in East Greenwich, R.I.: Greg appears at Rocky Hill School. Click here for information.

Media:

Greg talks to Rocky Hill School's James Tracy on his Best Schools blog

In The Huffington Post, John Thompson writes about how the book gives him faith in the future of public schools.

Parents' Choice writer Ann Oldenburg talks to Greg about the book and the antiquated idea of "screen time."

The Chicago Tribune's Rick Asa name-checks the book in a piece on how technology is reshaping education. 

Education Writers Association's Emily Richmond talks to Greg as part of EWA's Summer Reading List.

Greg appears on Wisconsin Public Radio's To the Best of Our Knowledge. Here's a link to the entire program on "The Power of Play," which features Ron Suskind and Peter Gray.

The Atlantic's Georgia Perry name-checks the book in a piece on games, learning and U.S. classrooms.

American Radio Works' Stephen Smith talks to Greg about the book for his education podcast.

Scientific American Mind excerpts the chapter on games and kids and violence.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel's Eric Hamilton name-checks the book in a piece about learning games research and the University of Wisconsin's Games + Learning + Society research center.

The Geek Spot reviews the book. Favorite line: "Toppo, you have made me a fan of your work."

Education Next excerpts the chapter on "Math Without Words," including Wuzzit Trouble and DragonBox.

The MIND Institute's Matthew Peterson talks to Greg about making games "tantalizingly tricky."

Gamification Corp.'s Gabe Zichermann talks to Greg about games, learning and robot journalism.

NPR's Eric Westervelt talks to Greg about the book, "hard fun," teaching and John Coltrane.

The Washington Post's T. Rees Shapiro reviews the book, calling it "broad and thoroughly researched."

Linda Breneman of Pixelkin blogs about the book, learning, Pokemon, and Walden, a Game.

The Deseret New's Eric Schulzke talks to Greg about the book, teaching, boredom and addiction. 

The book makes veteran journalist John Merrow's list of "What's Working Well in Public Education."

Syndicated columnist Leanna Landsmann name-checks the book.

Greg appears on New Hampshire Public Radio's Word of Mouth.

Greg appears on KERA's Think call-in show - National Public Radio in Dallas.

Bellwether Education's Carolyn Chuong talks to Greg about the book.

Greg talks to Jon Harrison of Classically Trained podcast about the book.

Salon excerpts the prologue: "We’re boring our kids in school: This easy reform will actually help them learn"

The book makes education journalist John Merrow's list of "What's Working Well in Public Education."

Medium excerpts the chapter on the race to create a prescription-strength video game to treat ADHD.

Forbes' Jordan Shapiro talks to Greg about how to transform education with video games.

Roger Riddell of Education Dive talks to Greg about the book.

The Marshall Project's Dana Goldstein talks to Greg about games, aggression, violence and school shooters.

KQED's Mind/Shift excerpts the chapter on Minnesota teacher Eric Nelson's game Fantasy Geopolitics.

The Washington Post's Jay Mathews writes about the book.

Games + Learning's Christopher B. Allen talks to Greg about the book.

U.S. News & World Report's Robert Pondiscio writes about the book. 

Scholastic's Tyler Reed talks to Greg about the book.

The Washington Examiner's Jason Russell writes about the book and Greg's Fordham event.

StateScoop's Corinne Lestch writes about the book, Walden, a Game, and Greg's Fordham event.

Quartz excerpts Greg's chapter on Dragonbox, a weird and wonderful math game.

Greg's op-ed on games' potential to replace standardized testing appears in The Washington Post.

Greg guest-blogs for Penelope Trunk on the importance of violent fantasy and role playing.

The Hechinger Report's Nichole Dobo interviews Greg and excerpts his profile on the creator of Dragonbox.

PCMag talks to Greg about the book and name-checks Quest to Learn school in New York City.

Education Week's Benjamin Herold does a Q&A with Greg about the book.

Forbes' Jordan Shapiro name-checks the book in a piece on games and learning.

Greg guest-blogs for Penelope Trunk on games and violence. A lively discussion follows.

Slate excerpts Chapter 1 with a piece on making learning more dangerous.